cureforbedbugs replied to your post “Teenage girls are not your oracle.”

Stop baiting me to be Dave.

I mean I already successfully baited myself to be girlboymusic so.


"teen girls" are a massive group to generalize about, is the problem — I had no idea how to perform taste as a teen girl, but then I barely care to do it now, so…? *shrug*

You might be interested in isabelthespy, who said some good things in this direction in her tags on that quote.  Also because she likes Sailor Moon.


12
Oct 20

To say “teen girls have not yet learned to perform taste” is to deny them agency.  If teen girls cannot perform, teen girls cannot control, cannot decide: what they display is what drips from them naturally.  To say teen girls cannot perform is to rob them of credit for their actions, and authority over their outer and inner lives.  Don’t trust teen girls, at least not any more than you would trust anyone else; teen girls are as capable of deceit, and subterfuge, and performance as anyone else, because teen girls are fully human.  That is their right. 


7
Oct 20

Teenage girls are not your oracle.


121
Oct 20
korhwythkevrinek:

britticisms:

Part of a longer essay I’m working on about relationships and performing personal taste. 

I dunno; I mean I learned to perform music taste while I was a teenage girl. And then I somehow managed to unlearn ‘performing musical taste’ in my late 30s, once I passed outside the age range where I was supposed to even have musical taste. I find this kind of fetishised ‘teenage girl taste’ trope really kinda weird, and sometimes borderline offensive. You think teenage girls don’t ~perform~ Teenage Girlhood while they’re in it? Good god, being a teenage girl is one long process of learning how to ~perform~ all kinds of things. Don’t you remember? Didn’t you have an adolescence?

korhwythkevrinek:

britticisms:

Part of a longer essay I’m working on about relationships and performing personal taste. 

I dunno; I mean I learned to perform music taste while I was a teenage girl. And then I somehow managed to unlearn ‘performing musical taste’ in my late 30s, once I passed outside the age range where I was supposed to even have musical taste. I find this kind of fetishised ‘teenage girl taste’ trope really kinda weird, and sometimes borderline offensive. You think teenage girls don’t ~perform~ Teenage Girlhood while they’re in it? Good god, being a teenage girl is one long process of learning how to ~perform~ all kinds of things. Don’t you remember? Didn’t you have an adolescence?


A Man (Who) Writes About Pop Music

tomewing:

That last reblog is very important. Read that. Follow the people in it, if you don’t already.

I write about pop music a lot - mostly older pop music, these days, which makes it easier to take a historical view on who-did-what. I am also a man, and I am a lot older now than most of the performers I write about were when they made their stuff. Though still younger than some of the other men writing about it.

Here’s what I think - mostly for the benefit of those other men. Perhaps not even for their benefit. Maybe everybody agrees with this stuff. It seems fairly obvious.

Pop music is a business that employs a lot of young women, though most of the high-up decision makers are still men. For the last fifteen to twenty years, I would say it’s become more reliant on those women. And it’s always relied, too, on the young women who buy records, buy downloads, listen to YouTube. If you write about pop, your writing - our writing - depends on the work and the consumer choices of women.

There are two things about every business that is male-dominated and employs young women. (Which is most businesses). The first is that the contributions of those women are far less likely to be acknowledged than the contributions of their male colleagues. The second is that the business is unlikely to be set up to protect those women from harassment or abuse, and - unless forced - will most likely side with a harasser.

Those aren’t just music biz problems, but they certainly apply within the music biz. But what does that mean, for me as a man lucky enough to write about pop music and be read sometimes? Young women who work in pop music do not always have full control over their creative output. But assuming they don’t have any control just reinforces the probable marginalisation of their contributions. Better to believe stars do have agency, and start thinking from there: if there is good evidence they did nothing and had no say, you can bet someone’s put it out there. Worst of all, maybe, would be to only grant them agency when they fuck up. Calling pop stars out for bullshit is fine, is necessary, but there’s something unpleasant when that’s the only time someone admits they have any autonomy.

And the other thing it means is that if someone does have the courage to come out and report abuse, I don’t spend my words and my space caviling and undermining and doubting.

TLDR: Men - if you write about pop in the 21st century, you are writing about work women are doing. Listen to them. Credit them. (I said it was fairly obvious!)


132
Oct 15

On Kesha, shadow-y men, and Tinashe:

aintgotnoladytronblues:

barrybailbondsman:

imathers:

crystalleww:

Kesha’s lawsuit against Dr. Luke has been foreshadowed by past events, but it’s nonetheless heartbreaking. I’m support Kesha 100%; it seems remarkable we don’t automatically draw connections between pop stars suffering “mental breakdowns” and the potential abusive men in their lives that are heralded as the creative masterminds behind their work. I hope Kesha escapes this contract; her musical career seems like a minor point in the grand scheme of issues here, but Dr. Luke has been largely credited as the architect of her sound and if she makes a change in artistic direction, it will be met with an enormous amount of industry bullshit about agency and authenticity.

This has become a recurring theme in pop music: the shadowy male producers who are the so-called brilliant masterminds behind these public young women. Kesha had Dr. Luke. Lady Gaga had RedOne. Ariana Grande had Harmony Samuels. I can’t remember the last time we talked about an up-and-coming female pop star without talking extensively about her core production team, and that often makes sense when looking down the credits. This is what the industry does. It pairs young women off with the real geniuses and puts them to work.

This makes the Tinashe album that came out last week pretty incredible. There’s no shadowy male producer behind Aquarius, and any attempt to try to define that album as such is bullshit. Aquarius sounds like an extension of Tinashe’s mixtapes which she recorded and produced in her home studio. Even with this so-called assembled team of superstar hitmakers, all the tracks on Aquarius are unmistakably Tinashe. The Stargate songs sound like Tinashe. The Mike WiLL song sounds like Tinashe. The Detail song sounds like Tinashe. Even the guitar solo on “Bet” is Tinashe, whose idea it was because she thinks they are “cool.” The only song that actually sounds like its producer is “2 On,” but even that sounds like unmistakably like Tinashe with the flirting and the winking and the charming that only the girl next door could bring to a DJ Mustard beat.

My favorite thing written about the new Tinashe album was by Meaghan, who points out, “Aquarius is an anomaly in an age of major label standardization: a debut done unmistakably on Tinashe’s own terms.” This is the only correct framing. Any attempt to credit it to a team of dudes is a massive disservice, but I’m not surprised: old school music criticism is not particularly interested in the artistic vision and genius of black women. Just ask Beyoncé.

(emphasis mine)

It’s so easy to read about Kesha’s lawsuit and feel hopeless. Men like Dr. Luke are given every opportunity, and even accusations of this magnitude are unlikely to torpedo his career. Conversely, by revealing herself as a victim of his assault, Kesha stands to lose everything. In the grand scheme of things it might seem relatively minor, but reframing the discussion around pop stars is a way to put power in the hands of the women creating music. When the narrative is one of ingénues, muses, protégés, and mild puppetry it reinforces the idea that women making music are nothing without their superstar producers. This, in turn, reinforces the fear and domination wielded by abusers. By discussing women as the architects of their creative vision, we can give strength to their choice of co-workers. Women like Tinashe (and Kesha, Gaga, Beyonce, Britney) are supremely talented regardless of their co-credits and the way we discuss that talent is important. The impulse to regurgitate every line item in the liner notes because #facts is incredibly strong, but ultimately these are albums that bear one name — the artist’s.  

emphasis mine because i don’t think i’ve ever heard something that’s been such a generally understood piece of background noise to all the discussions i’ve ever had about pop music get put so succinctly before. holy shit all of this, though, all of it. 


10
Aug 18

Okay, this journal is done, lemme know if you want to follow the next one.


dickdash:

Stevie Nicks.
The very first moment I set eyes on Stevie was the very first moment I set foot in “control room A” at Sound City. My times at Sound City & friendship with Stevie & Lindsey would be intertwined like a ball of string after a first kite flight for at least the next couple of years. Kieth Olsen got me hired there through Dave Devore, & Joe Gottfried, the then owner of Sound City. My first task was to help paint the control room (this horrible brown color I think) in “studio A” along with a few other unfortunate souls Joe had managed to recruit. Among these souls were Stevie & Lindsey & I swear, Stevie had more paint on her then on the ceiling she was supposed to be painting (not exactly the queen of the paint roller on a poll). Even through the dripping brown paint on her face I could see she was Quite beautiful. They (Stevie & Lindsey) were living at Kieth Olsen’s house in Coldwater Canyon at the time & felt obligated to help Keith & Joe with the studio for upcoming studio time & efforts put into their career. As I looked up at the ceiling, I realized that this girl was not suited for painting & grabbed the roller out of her hand & took over. Now that I think of it, I never stopped looking up when standing next to Stevie. Now I see a free spirit, rustling like leaves on a tall tree anchored in deep earth, not uneven paint. But I’m still looking up. Even though you were sometimes a pain in my neck, (looking up too much I suppose) I’m still looking up.
Love Forever,




….r

dickdash:

Stevie Nicks.

The very first moment I set eyes on Stevie was the very first moment I set foot in “control room A” at Sound City. My times at Sound City & friendship with Stevie & Lindsey would be intertwined like a ball of string after a first kite flight for at least the next couple of years. Kieth Olsen got me hired there through Dave Devore, & Joe Gottfried, the then owner of Sound City. My first task was to help paint the control room (this horrible brown color I think) in “studio A” along with a few other unfortunate souls Joe had managed to recruit. Among these souls were Stevie & Lindsey & I swear, Stevie had more paint on her then on the ceiling she was supposed to be painting (not exactly the queen of the paint roller on a poll). Even through the dripping brown paint on her face I could see she was Quite beautiful. They (Stevie & Lindsey) were living at Kieth Olsen’s house in Coldwater Canyon at the time & felt obligated to help Keith & Joe with the studio for upcoming studio time & efforts put into their career. As I looked up at the ceiling, I realized that this girl was not suited for painting & grabbed the roller out of her hand & took over. Now that I think of it, I never stopped looking up when standing next to Stevie. Now I see a free spirit, rustling like leaves on a tall tree anchored in deep earth, not uneven paint. But I’m still looking up. Even though you were sometimes a pain in my neck, (looking up too much I suppose) I’m still looking up.

Love Forever,

….r


5
Aug 09

I am celebrating today by:

- taking a shower
- not doing work
- wearing a dress I haven’t worn in a long time
- picking up my requests from the library
- getting a whole wheat everything bagel with tofu vegetable cream cheese
- putting sliced radishes + tomatoes + bell pepper on it when I got home
- eating it off a really nice plate
- taking my library books and some clementines and some cold water to the park
- maybe getting falafel for dinner idk